Guild DV4

Guild DV4

This is the first guitar I’ve bought on eBay and I’m pleased to say it went as smoothly as could be hoped. I was the only bidder, I guess as Guild guitars are more expensive in Europe and perhaps not so desirable. Anyhow, I’m really pleased with it and feel I got quite a bargain. The guitar has a spruce top with solid mahogany back and sides and a hand-rubbed (i.e. matte) finish. It’s brand new and without a ding or scratch anywhere. Of course as it’s new it hasn’t started to open up yet, so I’m expecting great things from it. The reason for buying this was so that I’d have a nice, trustworthy solid-wood guitar for busking and travelling; something plain and simple, but loud enough to be heard out on the streets. And d’you know, I think that’s exactly what I’ve got!! It came with an original hardshell case so this will be my guitar for jamming with my mate back home in Scotland. — he also has a Guild, a DV6 which I believe is a more deluxe version of my DV4.


Recordings

Here are some recordings I’ve done on this guitar. I record using condenser microphones. Here’s a page showing the gear I used: Recording Gear

Islay Ranters Reel

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Trainstop Blues

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Lola, the Kinks

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Quicksand, David Bowie

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Brook Tamar Baritone

Brook Tamar Baritone: European spruce top, English walnut back and sides. Gold Schaeller tuners; bound fretboard and headstock. Scale length: 690mm (27 inches).

Recordings

Here are some recordings I’ve done on this guitar. I record using condenser microphones. Here’s a page showing the gear I used: Recording Gear

Messing around in CGCFGC

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Ye Banks & Braes

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Gibson J150

Gibson J-150

I’ve now sold this guitar but shall keep this page up for those who are interested in seeing some pictures and hearing some recordings. I sold it to make way in part for the Heiner D and Brook Tamar baritone.

Meet my Gibson J-150. I went into the shop where I bought my Lakewood for some some strings and thought I’d have a browse, as one does in a guitar shop. I saw this ugly, gaudy-looking guitar that screamed out country & western hanging on the wall and thought I’d give it a try. It took just one strum of an open E chord and I was floored. This was a J-200 and, after that chord had been strummed, its gaudy pickguard and over-the-top fretboard inlays were suddenly things of great beauty. GAS had struck! I hung it back up, palms sweaty, heart thumping and walked away. Well, who wouldn’t with a ticket price of €4,200?

But of course I couldn’t stop thinking about it, and started trying to justify it. I needed a strummer, right? Something loud and flamboyant for when I’m feeling in need of some chest-rumbling bass, right? Long story short, I bought it, got it home, and was horrified to find a crack across the bridge, right where the holes are for the bridge pins. I rushed it back to the shop and awaited the results. A week later the shop guy brought it round repaired but I’d decided that a repaired guitar just wasn’t what I was after and got myself a refund.

A month or so later I was in London for the Paul McCartney gig and popped into the Acoustic Centre near Liverpool St Station. They had a J-150 there, which is basically the same guitar as the J-200 but with fewer appointments, i.e. no binding on the neck or headstock, no rosewood seam down flamed maple back, Indian rosewood moustache bridge and fretboard rather than Honduran, but as far as I could tell, the grade of woods used is the same as on the J-200, but for a lot less lolly.

The Acoustic Centre has a pretty impressive inventory and I got to compare the J-150 with a couple of Lowden Os, a couple of Lakewood jumbos and a Martin D-28; that made me sure that the J-150 had the tone I was after and then the umming/ahhing process began. I’m pleased to report that my lovely wife told me to stop being so silly and just buy the darned thing. So I did!

Recordings

Here are some recordings I’ve done on this guitar. I record using condenser microphones. Here’s a page showing the gear I used: Recording Gear

Highway 29, Bruce Springsteen

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Trainstop Blues

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Lakewood M14

The Lakewood M-14CP (cutaway, pickup) has a solid cedar top and mahogany back and sides. This was my first “real” guitar, bought in December 2002 after much deliberation. Much thanks is due to the generous posters on the Acoustic Guitar forum, which I stumbled upon when I knew next to nothing about acoustic guitars. The advice I got over there was sterling, and still is for that matter. Of course, the downside is the affliction affectionately known as GAS: Guitar Acquisition Syndrome, an affliction for which there is, sadly, no cure.

I’ve got to know my Lakewood pretty well now and it has inspired me more than I thought possible. It found a great partnership with Elixer Nanoweb 12s. I compared those with a set of D’Addario EXP 11 lights and would say that the D’Addarios give the guitar a more “woody” tone, but the brightness of the Elixers seems to suit the Lakewood very well. For altered tunings, I hunted for a set of GHS True Mediums to try out but couldn’t find them. I was then pointed in the direction of John Pearse’s Slack Key strings which did the trick; this package of strings is put together for altered tunings, being a mixture of lights and mediums and they work great. I was also put onto a custom set of Newtones by Rob Jessop, who favours CGDGAD for his Brook Lyn. They use a different core for the wound strings, which results in more tension. Tonally speaking, they’re similar to the Slack Keys, but, for longevity, I’d choose the Newtones every time.

I spent some time working on String Letter Publishing’s Acoustic Blues Guitar Essentials book on the Lakewood and it really suits bluesy chord progressions and boogie woogie bass lines. I recorded a song for our inspired by Freya called the Freya Shuffle; have a listen and see what you think!

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I’ve also been taking advantage of Little Brother’s resources — I got his DVD and have to say it’s pretty good! I picked up his interpretation of John Hurt’s Candyman from his site too. Nice work, Doug!

I also have a Mel Bay book of British Fingerstyle Guitar, featuring Bert Jansch, John Renbourn and Davey Graham, and have been working on Bert’s Black Water Side. It’s a tricky one but it’s coming along nicely with hours and hours of practice!

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I’ve also recently got two instructional videos of Tony McManus, a Scots fingerstyle guitarist who plays celtic pipe and fiddle music on guitar. If you haven’t heard this guy, I strongly suggest that you do – unbelievable!

And my most recent discovery is El McMeen; he plays almost exclusively in CGDGAD, a tuning which seems to be what I’ve been looking for without even knowing it! I’ve had the Lakewood in that tuning for a couple of weeks now and really like the way it sounds on the Lakewood.

I’ve posted a review of this guitar over at Harmony Central under the username Cams.

Here is a high-ish res image showing the colour of the mahogany. I sat the guitar down to stop playing for a bit and the sun was coming in the window and it lit up the mahogany making it almost magical.

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Recordings

Here are some recordings I’ve done on this guitar. I record using condenser microphones. Here’s a page showing the gear I used: Recording Gear

Trainstop Blues

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Blackbird

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Ye Banks & Braes

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Hurt – Johnny Cash version

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The Queen & the Soldier

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Gallery